The Network has endorsed the Honor and Remember Flag

 
 
Facebook Logo
 

Events

The Annual Ex-POW/MIA Vigil hosted by Dept of NH Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) on Sept. 24, 2016 at the NH Veterans Cemetery.

Event start: Sat, 09/24/2016 - 10:00am
Event end: Sat, 09/24/2016 - 11:00am
Location: New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery
The annual ceremony, hosted by Dept of NH Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), will be held at the Circle of Flags.

Some folding chairs will be available but attendees are encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs.


National POW/MIA Recognition Day in the United States

The United States’ National POW/MIA Recognition Day is observed across the nation on the third Friday of September each year. Many Americans take the time to remember those who were prisoners of war (POW) and those who are missing in action (MIA), as well as their families.

National League of Families’ POW/MIA flag is displayed with the United States flag.©iStockphoto.com/Joseph C. Justice Jr.

What Do People Do?

Many Americans across the United States pause to remember the sacrifices and service of those who were prisoners of war (POW), as well as those who are missing in action (MIA), and their families. All military installations fly the National League of Families’ POW/MIA flag, which symbolizes the nation’s remembrance of those who were imprisoned while serving in conflicts and those who remain missing.

Veteran rallies take place in many states, such as Wisconsin, in the United States on National POW/MIA Recognition Day. United States flags and POW/MIA flags are flown on this day and joint prayers are made for POWs and those missing in action. National POW/MIA Recognition Day posters are also displayed at college or university campuses and public buildings to promote the day. Remembrance ceremonies and other events to observe the day are also held in places such as the Pentagon, war memorials and museums.

Public Life

National POW/MIA Recognition Day is not a federal public holiday in the United States but it is a national observance.

Background

There are 1,741 American personnel listed by the Defense Department's POW/MIA Office as missing and unaccounted for from the Vietnam War, as of April 2009. The number of United States personnel accounted for since the end of the Vietnam War in 1975 is 841. About 90 percent of the 1,741 people still missing were lost in Vietnam or areas of Laos and Cambodia under Vietnam's wartime control, according to the National League of Families website (cited in the United States Army website).

The United States Congress passed a resolution authorizing National POW/MIA Recognition Day to be observed on July 18, 1979. It was observed on the same date in 1980 and was held on July 17 in 1981 and 1982. It was then observed on April 9 in 1983 and July 20 in 1984. The event was observed on July 19 in 1985, and then from 1986 onwards the date moved to the third Friday of September. The United States president each year proclaims National POW/MIA Recognition Day. Many states in the USA also proclaim POW/MIA Recognition Day together with the national effort.

Symbols

The National League of Families’ POW/MIA flag symbolizes the United States’ resolve to never forget POWs or those who served their country in conflicts and are still missing. Newt Heisley designed the flag. The flag’s design features a silhouette of a young man, which is based on Mr Heisley’s son, who was medically discharged from the military. As Mr Heisley looked at his returning son’s gaunt features, he imagined what life was for those behind barbed wire fences on foreign shores. He then sketched the profile of his son as the new flag's design was created in his mind.

The flag features a white disk bearing in black silhouette a man’s bust, a watch tower with a guard on patrol, and a strand of barbed wire. White letters “POW” and “MIA”, with a white five-pointed star in between, are typed above the disk. Below the disk is a black and white wreath above the motto “You Are Not Forgotten” written in white, capital letters.




"As an American asked to serve, I was prepared to fight,
to be wounded,
to be captured and even prepared to die,
but I was not prepared to be abandoned."


(Former POW Eugene "Red" McDaniel - Source:
VVnW POW/MIA Page)



Have YOU contacted your legislative leaders concerning the terminology?

Have YOU asked them to account for our POW/MIAs?
Information can be found on the website: www.northeastpowmianetwork.org


Past Freedom Rides

Please take a few moments today, to remember our missing soldiers, and those held as prisoners of war. Attend a ceremony in your area. Say a prayer for POWs and MIAs. Also, write to your senators and congressman to urge continued and increased effort towards bringing every service man and woman home. POW Recognition Day History

As time goes on remains are found
And another finds his way back home
After years spent lost on foreign shores
Feeling forgotten and left all alone.

But they will never be forgotten
By the Country they went off to serve
We will search until all are returned
To loved ones, the least they all deserve.

There are new ways to identify
DNA can tell, just who they may be
Those lost in those past conflicts
A Hero home, their final destiny.

War is so terrible and horrific
Worse for the POW and the MIA
All of those unaccounted for
Compounds the price they chose to pay.

Each year, we should all remember
Those we lost in the fog of War
Better yet, take a moment every day
While we appreciate what they fought for.

POW/MIA Recognition Day
Dedicated to honor their memory
For the time or life they gave
To keep this, 'The Land of the Free'.

Del 'Abe' Jones
09.13.2007

National POW/MIA Recognition Day

When : Third Friday of September

POW/MIA Recognition Day is a day of remembrance and hope for the speedy and safe return of American Prisoners of War, and those still Missing in Action. It also seeks the return of the remains of fallen soldiers.

The first official commemoration of POW/MIAs was July 18, 1979. It was the result of resolutions passed in Congress. The first national ceremony was held on this date. Over the next several years, it was held in varying dates of the year. Finally, in 1986, The National League of Families proposed the third Friday in September as a day to recognize and remember POW/MIAs. This date was selected, as it is not associated with any wars. Each year, the president of the United States issues a proclamation on this day.

Did you know? Federal law requires the POW/MIA flag to be flown on the following days:

Armed Forces Day, Third Saturday in May
Memorial Day
Flag Day, June 14
Independence Day, July 4
POW/MIA Day, 3rd Friday of September
Veterans Day, Nov. 11

You will also notice the POW/MIA flag flown at all US Post office buildings, Veterans Administration, military memorial facilities, and many U.S. government buildings.

Please take a few moments today, to remember our missing soldiers, and those held as prisoners of war. Attend a ceremony in your area. Say a prayer for POWs and MIAs. Also, write to your senators and congressman to urge continued and increased effort towards bringing every service man and woman home. POW Recognition Day History



Weekly POW/ MIA Vigil ~ Meredith NH

When: Every Thursday evening
Time: 7:00pm
Where: Heskey Park, Meredith, NH
Longest running continuous vigil in America.
Location is the POW Memorial in Hesky Park, Meredith NH

Contact@northeastpowmianetwork.org for additional information

Monthly POW/MIA VIGIL ~ Manchester, NH

When: 1st Wednesday of every month. 
Time: 7:00pm  
Where: Veterans Park on Elm Street

Weekly POW/MIA Vigil ~ Fair Haven, Vermont
When: Every Thursday evening
Time: 7:00pm
Where: Veteran's Memorial Park


We must NEVER forget!

 

We are a completely volunteer organization, veterans and non-veterans, using awareness, communication, education, legislation, and compassion to assuage the pain associated with one of the most devastating outcomes of service to one’s Country. As we honor POW/MIAs, returned and still waiting to come home, we aggressively pursue means to return the missing and protect those serving.
Copyright © 2016
Northeast POW/MIA Network